Politics

Ex-Patriot Matt Light loses bid for college committee seat


Matt Light
FILE — New England Patriots offensive lineman Matt Light speaks throughout a information convention, Monday, May 7, 2012, at Gillette Stadium, in Foxborough, Mass. Light has been blocked in his bid to win a seat on the Foxborough School Committee. The former offensive lineman, who had been crucial of college masks mandates and different well being restrictions throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, completed third in Monday’s election in a four-way race for 2 open seats. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — Former New England Patriots offensive lineman Matt Light has been blocked in his bid to win a seat on the Foxborough School Committee.

Light, who had been crucial of college masks mandates and different well being restrictions throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, completed third in Monday’s election in a four-way race for 2 open seats.

Light, 43, bought 1,137 votes, in accordance with unofficial outcomes posted in town’s web site. Board Chair Robert Canfield III and fellow incumbent Brent Ruter, who each supported masking necessities, bought 1,792 and 1,710 votes respectively.

“I was willing to do the job, but it wasn’t my time,” Light wrote on his marketing campaign Facebook web page Tuesday. “My focus is needed in other areas and after this experience I’m more thankful for all the people in my life today than ever before.”

He mentioned he’s proud that he didn’t resort to non-public assaults and can now flip his consideration again to the Light Foundation, the charity he based to empower youth via out of doors actions.

Light, who was on three Super Bowl-winning groups throughout an 11-year NFL profession with the Patriots from 2001 till 2011, has 4 kids who’ve both gone via or are enrolled within the city’s colleges.

He and his spouse advised The Sun Chronicle their son has a coronary heart situation and throughout the masks mandate college officers ignored their issues about the necessity to test him for indicators of oxygen loss.

“We wanted our kids to be able to go to school, being able to look each other in the eye and in the face and not have to worry about the masks and everything that comes with that and be in person,” he advised The Boston Globe.




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