Politics

UK imposing new sanctions on Russia after Vladimir Putin’s ‘illegal’ Ukraine announcement


The UK will announce new sanctions on Russia on Tuesday “in response to their breach of international law and attack on Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

It comes as the Ukraine crisis intensified after Russian President Vladimir Putin said he would recognise two breakaway republics.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the decision to recognise Donetsk and Luhansk in eastern Ukraine was an “ill omen” and a flagrant breach of international law.

Foreign Secretary Liz Truss tweeted about the new sanctions on Monday evening after saying Mr Putin’s actions could not be allowed to go “unpunished”.

She said: “Tomorrow we will be announcing new sanctions on Russia in response to their breach of international law and attack on Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.”



Boris Johnson has accused Russia of breaching international law

Earlier on Monday, the Foreign Secretary said the recognition of the Donetsk People’s Republic and the Luhansk People’s Republic as independent states “demonstrates Russia’s decision to choose a path of confrontation over dialogue”.

“We will co-ordinate our response with allies,” she said. “We will not allow Russia’s violation of its international commitments to go unpunished.”

In a lengthy televised address, Putin recognised two breakaway regions in eastern Ukraine as independent entities, drawing U.S. and European vows of new sanctions and upping the ante in a crisis the West fears could unleash a major war.



Ukrainian soldiers have been taking part in military drills as the threat of war looms

Putin, looking visibly angry, described Ukraine as an integral part of Russia’s history and said eastern Ukraine was ancient Russian lands and that he was confident the Russian people would support his decision.

Russian state television showed Putin, joined by Russia-backed separatist leaders, signing a decree recognising the independence of the two Ukrainian breakaway regions along with agreements on cooperation and friendship.

Defying Western warnings against such a move, Putin had announced his decision in phone calls to the leaders of Germany and France earlier, both of whom voiced disappointment, the Kremlin said.

Moscow’s action may well torpedo a last-minute bid for a summit with U.S. President Joe Biden to prevent Russia from invading Ukraine.

The rouble extended its losses as Putin spoke, at one point sliding beyond 80 per dollar.

Biden will issue an executive order soon prohibiting “new investment, trade, and financing by U.S. persons to, from, or in” the two breakaway regions, the White House said. It will “also provide authority to impose sanctions on any person determined to operate in those areas of Ukraine,” White House spokesperson Jen Psaki said in a statement.

Did you know you can keep up to date with the latest news by signing up to our daily newsletter?

We send a morning and lunchtime newsletter covering the latest headlines every day.

We also send coronavirus updates at 5pm on weekdays, and a round up of the week’s must-read stories on Sunday afternoons.

Signing up is simple, easy and free.

You can pop your email address into the sign up box above, hit Subscribe and we’ll do the rest.

Alternatively, you can sign up and check out the rest of our newsletters here.

Psaki said more measures would be forthcoming and the ones being prepared in response to Putin’s decree were separate from sanctions the United States and its allies have been readying if Russia invades Ukraine.

The European Union “will react with sanctions against those involved in this illegal act,” President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen and European Council President Charles Michel said in a joint statement.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg accused Russia of continuing to fuel the conflict in eastern Ukraine and “trying to stage a pretext” for a further invasion. Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine in 2014.

In his address, Putin delved into history as far back as the Ottoman empire and as recent as the tensions over NATO’s eastward expansion – a major irritant for Moscow in the present crisis.

With his decision, Putin brushed off Western warnings that such a step would be illegal, would kill off peace negotiations and would trigger sanctions against Moscow.

“I deem it necessary to make a decision that should have been made a long time ago – to immediately recognise the independence and sovereignty of the Donetsk People’s Republic and the Luhansk People’s Republic,” Putin said.




Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.